New Home Tips, Trends, and Ideas - Raleigh Custom Home Builders

Top 5 New home storage ideas | Built in storage designs

Posted by Penny Hull on Thu, Mar 28, 2013 @ 05:03 AM

New home storage solutions

Photos of storage ideas

New home designs will continue to focus on incorporating plenty of storage space. Some popular built in storage centers include: built-in window benches, bookcases, entertainment centers, cubbies, and more. See photos of recently completed NC new homes - and get ideas for maximizing storage in your new home.

Storage Idea #1: Built in window bench with storage

2013 New Home Storage Solutions | Photos of Storage Ideas

 

Storage should save space in your new home, not eat it up.

More homebuyers are including built-in window benches with
"secret" storage hidden below.

Built-in benches provide extra seating, and can be used to store easily available, bulky items such as throw blankets.

 

 

2013 New Home Storage Solutions | Photos of Storage Ideas

 

 

 

These two photos are examples of custom handcrafted built in benches.

The first bench is tucked at one end of a sunroom.

The second bench is located in a breakfast nook, beside a rear French door.

 

 

 

Storage Idea #2: Built in storage cubbies

Top 5 2013 New home storage ideas | Built in storage designs

 

New home storage solutions are all about the ability to both store AND display.

 

The storage cubbies in this example were added below a serving bar connecting the kitchen to the family room.

 

This storage solution saves space and adds dimension, while serving as a convenient drop-in and sort-out source.

 

These cubbies are perfect for decorative bins, books, movies, games and toys.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Storage Idea #3: Built in bookcases

 2013 New Home Storage Solutions | Photos of Storage Ideas

When you build a custom home, bookcases can be added to almost any room - and your builder can give you some great ideas for how to stack, place and arrange them to suit your needs, best.

Common locations for built-in bookcases are the great room, home office, and play/bonus room, but with a custom home you can use your imagination to add put-it-away centers to any spot where things can be tucked.

In the photo to the right, the bookcase was further customized to create a space for a piano, with shelves for music to the right, and a framed photo area above.

 

Storage Idea #4: Built in bookcase cabinetry

2013 New Home Storage Solutions | Photos of Storage Ideas

Another popular design feature is built-in bookcases with cabinet storage below.

In this example, taken from a version of the Dugan plan, a full wall was converted into a built-in bookcase/cabinet entertainment center that serves as a focal point for a soaring great room.

 

See more photos of this home, click here.

 

Storage Idea #5: Built in entertainment centers

Top 5 2013 New home storage ideas | Built in storage designsBuilt-in entertainment centers can be configured into any shape or size when you build a custom home with Stanton Homes.

In this example, built-in storage was designed to stack side-by-side with the fireplace. A wall mount was installed in preparation for a hanging flat screen TV. It's all wrapped in classic color, to bring even more attention to the artistry.

 

 

 

 

New home designs provide efficient, creative, and discrete storage solutions, from built-in window benches to bookcases, entertainment centers, cubbies, and shelves that fit your lifestyle. Contact Stanton Homes to learn more about building a custom home in North Carolina.

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Tags: home storage ideas, built in storage design, custom home design, new home design trends, custom home design trends

Custom Kitchen Designs | Open Floor Plan Ideas

Posted by Penny Hull on Thu, Mar 14, 2013 @ 13:03 PM

Open Kitchen Design

Floor Plans with Open Concept Living

An easy-access, open kitchen design is the most popular approach to new home floor plans. "Open concept living" is a broadly applied term, but these photos help demonstrate the appeal of popular kitchen designs that incorporate the open floor plan concept.

One of the top design elements of an open kitchen is a window or cut out opening to the family room.   Cut out or "window" openings between the Kitchen and Great Room can give an impression of spaciousness, without losing upper cabinet storage space. Here's how it works:

 

Open Kitchen Design Example #1

Open Kitchen Design | Floor Plans with Open Concept Living

This first example, found in a version of Stanton Homes' Almodovar plan, features an arched opening from the kitchen to the vaulted great room.  

 

 The kitchen counter continues past the opening, providing additional surface area - perfect for serving drinks or passing appetizers.  

 

 

Open Kitchen Design | Floor Plans with Open Concept Livingbar height wrap-around serving bar connects  the kitchen and breakfast nook.

 This open kitchen design maintains an easy flow between all central entertainment rooms of the home.

Click here to watch a photo tour of this custom home.

 

 

Open Kitchen Design Example #2

Open Kitchen Design | Floor Plans with Open Concept LivingThis second example portrays how an open kitchen design incorporates an even wider opening into the family room.

 

This large window cut-out allows for even more engagement between rooms, with flow-through appeal that welcomes interaction.

 

 

 

Open Kitchen Design | Floor Plans with Open Concept Living

 The window pass-through in this example also offers an extensive shelf - a perfect place for display or storage as well as a handy way to move articles from room to room without going all the way around.

 

 The kitchen pictured here is taken from a version of the Devonsboro.

Click here to watch a photo tour of this open concept home.

 

 

Open Kitchen Design Example #3

Open Kitchen Design | Floor Plans with Open Concept Living

This third example portrays an open kitchen design that includes a window to the sun room.

The raised height bar is perfect for serving hot chocolate in the winter and frosted treats in the summer.

 

 

 

 

 

Open Kitchen Design | Floor Plans with Open Concept Living

In this example - taken from a version of the Treehouse - the window opens up the kitchen so that everyone can take advantage of amazing views in every direction.

 

Watch a photo tour of the Treehouse - and see more one-of-a-kind designer details the experts at Stanton Homes integrated into every room to further open this floor plan.

 

Open Kitchen Design Example #4

Open Kitchen Design | Floor Plans with Open Concept Living

 

In this fourth example, the kitchen cut-out spans across the breakfast room, allowing for an angled serving bar.

 While many floor plans include an angled island completely open to the family room, this open kitchen is able to include additional upper cabinets.  

The corner sink faces the Great Room, so that clean up can be accomplished while still allowing for interaction with the family or a view of a favorite show.

 

Open Kitchen Design | Floor Plans with Open Concept Living

Archways further expand the feeling of sweeping openess throughout this custom home, including a two story barrel vault foyer, arched opening to the formal dining room, and arched hallway to the kitchen. 

Watch a photo tour of this home - a version of the Beaufort.

 

 

Open Kitchen Design Example #5

Open Kitchen Design | Floor Plans with Open Concept Living

 

 This fifth open kitchen design also portrays the way a single design can vary, with an open design kitchen as the focal point.  This is another approach to the Beaufort - a top requested open concept living floor plan.

 This custom kitchen layout integrates even more upper cabinet storage - something to keep in mind when creating your own open design.

 

 

Open Kitchen Design | Floor Plans with Open Concept Living

Tons of windows add to the feeling of endless open space between the kitchen, breakfast room, and family room.

 

 

Watch a photo tour of this version of the Beaufort - click here.

 

 

 

More Design Trends for New Homes

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Tags: Open Kitchen Design, Open Concept Living, custom home design, custom home design trends

New Home Design Trends | Are New Homes Getting Smaller?

Posted by Penny Hull on Mon, Jan 21, 2013 @ 06:01 AM

The Incredible Shrinking Home

Raleigh New Home Trends

We've all heard numerous times that the average new home size is getting smaller. 

But is today's new home smaller than the one you grew up in?  Or is it just better planned and built than homes a few years ago?  Let's take a look at what's really been going on with new home sizes over the past 40 years or so! 

Home Size | Raleigh Custom Home Builders

In 1973, the average new home in the United States was only 1,660 square feet.   That's average - meaning many homes were much smaller.

If you grew up in the 70s, you probably remember sharing a much smaller home than the one you're currently living in, probably with a couple of siblings!

  • The average new home size did not exceed 1,800 square feet until 13 years later.  In 1986, the average new home was a whopping 1,825 square feet.
  • In just one year, the average home size jumped from 1,825 square feet in 1986, to 1,905 square feet in 1987 (more room to watch the tv debut of "The Simpsons"!)
  • In only two more years, 1989 saw the average home size increase to 2,035 square feet.
  • It took another 5 years to break the 2,100 square foot barrier, which happened in both 1994 and 1996.
  • And another 5 years later, in 1999, the average home size was 2,223 square feet. 
  • But homeowners kept asking for larger homes.  It only took another two years to break the next barrier.  In 2001, the average new home size was 2,324 square feet.
  • Not done yet!  In 2005, the average home was 2,434 square feet, over 2400 for the first time.
  • And in 2007, the average new home was 2,521 square feet, the largest to date.

Where are New Home Sizes Today?

After peaking at 2,521 square feet in 2007, the average new home stayed constant in 2008, decreased in size in 2009 and 2010, but bounced back up in 2011. The average new home size in 2011 was 2,480 square feet.

New homes have made some incredible gains in size over the past 40 years or so.

The average new home in 2010 was:

  • 44% Larger than in 1973 (37 years ago)What is the average new home size? 2012 new home trends | raleigh new homes
  • 41% Larger than in 1976 (34 years ago)
  • 31% Larger than in 1986 (24 years ago)
  • 6% Larger than in 2000 (10 years ago)
  • From 1973 to 2004, the average home increased in size by 22 square feet per year.
  • From 2004 to 2007, the average home increased by 43 square feet per year, double the typical rate.

Why is today's new home smaller than it was a few years ago?

  • Homebuyers are much more budget conscious
  • Homebuyers are not as interested in rooms they have little to no use for
  • Homebuyers want a home that works the way they need it to, rather than the biggest home on the street.

More New Home Size Trend Topics:

New Home Size Trends - What's Happened over 40 Years?

2012 New Home Trends - Homes 1799 Square Feet and Smaller 

2012 New Home Trends - Trends in Homes from 1800 to 2399 Square Feet  

2012 New Home Trends - Trends in Homes from 2400 to 2999 Square Feet

2012 New Home Trends - Trends in Homes from 3000 to 3999 Square Feet

2012 New Home Trends - Trends in Homes 4000+ Square Feet

Tags: new home styles, average new home size, new home trends, custom home design trends

5 Least Popular Raleigh New Home Features

Posted by Penny Hull on Mon, Oct 01, 2012 @ 08:10 AM

Least Popular Raleigh New Home Features

We love to show off photos of NC custom homes that include all your favorite features. What design trends are we NOT showing you? Here are our top 5 LEAST favorite design features - with some good reasons why they are no longer popular in Raleigh, NC new homes. 

 

1. Brass FixturesDesign Trends to Avoid! | Least Popular New Home Features

In 2012 new homes, brass is out and brushed nickel and oil rubbed bronze are contending for the number one seat. 

Stainless steel fixtures, particularly in the kitchen, are also very popular in Raleigh new homes.

 

 

 

2. Carpet Throughout

Design Trends to Avoid! | Least Popular New Home FeaturesMany new homes are trending towards incorporating hardwood flooring throughout the entire home (or throughout the entire first floor of a home). But that can be expensive, depending on the type of hardwood.

A more popular (and money savvy) alternative is to include carpet in all bedrooms, hallways, staircases, and bonus rooms, with tile in wet areas and hardwoods in the main living areas.

 

 

3. Closed Floor PlansDesign Trends to Avoid! | Least Popular New Home Features

It will be difficult to find a 2012 new custom home in the Raleigh, NC area with a closed floor plan design.

Homeowners are trending towards kitchens open to the great room, vaulted ceiling styles, and more open areas throughout.

Second story overlooks are also a popular way to keep floor plans open.

 

4. Popcorn Ceiling Styles

Design Trends to Avoid! | Least Popular New Home Features

New homeowners opt to include smooth ceilings over popcorn ceilings - and for good reason.

Popcorn ceilings look out-of-date, cannot easily be repainted, can be expensive to remove down the road, and can distract attention away from the specialty crafted barrel, vaulted, and trey ceiling designs in NC custom homes.

 

5. Formal Living Rooms

Design Trends to Avoid! | Least Popular New Home FeaturesIn line with the trend towards more open living is more casual living styles. Floor plans are eliminating formal living rooms, which serve as underused and unnecessary space in the modern home.

Instead, new homeowners are expanding the square footage of the single great room, and often adding a first floor office or computer nook.

 

 

Designing your custom home with all the right features can be EASY - when you work with the experts at Stanton Homes. From floor plan design down to kitchen knob selections, you’ll know just what you’re getting, up front, when you build a Stanton Home.

Want to get back to the design trends that ARE popular? Read about North Carolina custom homes.

Kitchen and bathroom design trends in NC new homes:

Top 10 Master Bath Trends

Top 5 Kitchen Tile Backsplash Ideas

Top 5 Kitchen Design Trends

Kitchen Cabinet Trends

Contact Stanton Homes for floor plan ideas, to get a new home cost estimate, or find out more about building a custom home in North Carolina.

Tags: least popular design ideas, raleigh nc new homes, nc custom homes, custom home design trends

Raleigh Two Master Suite Homes | Two Master Floor Plans

Posted by Penny Hull on Fri, Jan 20, 2012 @ 10:01 AM

Raleigh Two Master Suite Homes

Floor Plan Design Trends

Looking for a new home with two master suites?  The Aycliffe is one of the custom designs we've created for homebuyers who need an extra master suite.   A second master bedroom can be terrific for a multi-generational household, or perfect for long term guests. 

The Aycliffe* - Two Master Suite Home Available in Raleigh

3,101 Sq ft - 4 Bedrooms - 3 Bathrooms

Two Master Suite Home - Floor Plan Design

Two Master Suite Custom Homes | Custom Floor Plans with Two Master Bedrooms | Two Master Bedroom Custom Floor Plans

Here's how Stanton Homes modified the Aycliffe into a two master suite home:


- Add full master suite bath with corner shower

- Add soaking tub with two windows for plenty of natural light

- Add his and hers walk-in-closets with wrap-around shelving

- Add separate his-and-hers vanities

 

 

 

Don't see a dual master suite home that works for you?  Let Stanton Homes know what you're looking for, and we'll help you design a dual master home that's perfect for you.   Here are some more ideas:

More Design/Build Home Plans with Two Master Suites:



Two Master Suite Custom Homes | Custom Floor Plans with Two Master Bedrooms | Two Master Bedroom Custom Floor Plans Dual Master Design Build House Plans | Custom Dual Master Homes | Dual Master Design Build Two Master Suite Custom Homes | Custom Floor Plans with Two Master Bedrooms | Two Master Bedroom Custom Floor Plans




Stanton Homes Dual master suite baths include special features like:

  • Corner showers
  • Separate rooms for the commode
  • His-and-hers vanities
  • Oversized his-and-hers walk-in-closets
  • Luxury bath features - see tub surround tile options
  • Spacious rooms
  • Choice of specialty ceiling styles, including vaulted ceilings.


More Dual Master Suite Custom Home Options

Learn the questions to ask before building a Multi Generational home.

Contact Stanton Homes for floor plan ideas, to get a new home cost estimate, or find out more about building a custom home in North Carolina.

Tags: new home trends, dual master suites, two master suites, multigenerational homes, custom home design trends

What Rooms are Buyers Asking For? | New Home Design Trends

Posted by Penny Hull on Wed, Dec 28, 2011 @ 06:12 AM

New Home Design Trends - 2011 AIA Survey

Special Function Rooms Becoming More Popular 

According to the home design trends survey for 2nd quarter 2011 from the American Institute of Architects, several special function rooms, such as home offices, outdoor living spaces, and mother-in-law suites have seen increased popularity from 2010 to 2011. 

A few other special function rooms have shown a decline in interest during this time period, including greenhouses, pet rooms/interior kennels, and storm rooms/safe rooms.

AIA's survey shows the following special function rooms as having an increasing interest level in 2011:

Hobby/game rooms show a come-back, from their decline in interest in 2009-2010 survey results.

Here is a chart of AIA's 2nd quarter 2011 special function room survey results:

 

New Home Design Trends 

Learn more about outdoor living spaces, home offices, mud rooms, and in law suites in central North Carolina new homes:

2012 Outdoor living trends - Top 5 most requested screen porch features

Most popular Raleigh new home outdoor living features

Which is more popular, formal dining rooms or home offices?

The Penelope - Video Tour with Builtin Home Office

Ways to save money in the laundry room - mud room features

What is a mudroom?

Mother in law suite homes - In-law suite floor plans

Custom Designed Inlaw Suites - See How We Make Floor Plan Modifications

 

Tags: new home trends, raleigh new homes, Outdoor living trends, custom home design trends

Are Kitchen Islands Going Out of Style? Kitchen Design Trends

Posted by Penny Hull on Wed, Oct 26, 2011 @ 16:10 PM

Island Kitchens vs Peninsula Kitchens

Are Kitchen Islands on the way Out?

Are kitchen islands on the way out?  We’re seeing a trend toward other approaches to kitchen space, and not everyone opts for an island anymore. Here’s what to consider before you add space that actually takes away what you think you’re getting.

Kitchens without an island

Packing an island into the kitchen isn’t always a good idea.  A kitchen island can crowd the room, and actually take away some of the spacious appeal – especially if there’s more than one cook in the kitchen!

With today’s trend toward smaller and more cost effective homes, there’s also some creativity in kitchen designs that make better use of tight spaces.

 

Here’s why islands will stay popular in big kitchens:

With cabinet wall dimension of 12' or greater, that 45's into another cabinet wall, the functionality of the kitchen can be improved if the third wall or "leg" of cabinets is an island.

This is because it allows you twice the access to the long wall that is 12' or greater, rather than just one access or traffic lane to access that whole wall and the other (probably shorter) wall.

Kitchen Island Design

Kitchen design is based on the work triangle - the number of steps between the sink, cook top, and refrigerator.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kitchen Island Design

 Kitchen Peninsula Design

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

  Kitchen Island Design                                                           Kitchen Peninsula Design

 

In smaller kitchens, the peninsula can be a better choice.

 

With a peninsula, you usually end up with more cabinets and greater square footage of counter top than when you cut up your space to include a small island.

If your longest wall is shorter than 12', the peninsula layout ensures maximum counter space and storage for the square footage available.

Peninsula Kitchen Design

A small island could just end up getting in the way - and offers less than maximum use for the space. 

If seating is a priority, you may actually be able to seat more at a peninsula than at an island!

Custom counter-tops, tile back splashes, special lighting and smaller details like cabinet hardware and wall color will give your kitchen a great look.

But don’t add an island thinking you’re giving yourself more space – only to find out another approach could have given you more of what you’re looking for.

Check with our design team to see what you can do with your kitchen layout, to make every space count.

More Kitchen Design Trends - NC Custom Home Builder Ideas and Tips

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Open Concept Kitchen Designs

Granite Countertop and Tile Backsplash Ideas

Kitchen Design Trends | Butler's Pantry Design Ideas

Top 5 Kitchen Design Trends

Cabinet Wood Types

Best Kitchen Countertop Ideas 

Do Stainless Steel Appliances Cost Too Much?


Tags: Kitchen Islands, kitchen design trends, custom home design trends

How to Create an Open Floor Plan - When to Remove or Add a Wall

Posted by Penny Hull on Wed, Oct 19, 2011 @ 06:10 AM

Can a floor plan be too open?

Open floor plan concepts - should there be a wall between the kitchen and living room?

 

We were recently asked this interior design question, through "Ask Andrea": 

"We were wondering if we should keep a wall up or take it down so that the living room and kitchen are completely open."

According to Andrea Enns, Stanton Homes' Interior Design Expert, most new homes DO keep the kitchen partially or fully open to the living or great room. With existing home renovations, however, there is more room to debate. Here's what Andrea has to say:

Thank you for your question regarding your dilemma of whether or nKitchen Open to Great Roomot to keep a wall in between your kitchen and living room.

That is a good question because there is not a hard and fast rule to this design question.

It all depends on your needs:

  • How you plan to arrange furniture
  • Whether or not you want to look at the kitchen when you are in the living room
  • Whether or not the two rooms coordinate together

Yikes! That's a lot to think about--no wonder you asked the question! 

We have worked on countless floor plans here at Stanton Homes and sometimes we are taking walls down but sometimes we add them back in


In very large floorplans, you can get away with not having walls in between rooms as there exists plenty of space to create natural separations and walk ways/traffic flow patterns from room to room that are "understood" but not necessarily physically there.

Kitchen Wall

Ironically, when spaces become smaller and you would automatically think that you can make them look larger by tearing down walls--you may want to consider your furniture placement needs before you do that and ultimately keep the wall. (The image to the left is an example of a wall between the kitchen and family room in a home just over 2,000sq ft).

If you have a wall, then you can go ahead and back a piece of furniture up to it without issue. However, in the absence of a wall when the space is limited, you may not feel that you can place the backs of your living room chairs for example, that close to the dining area of the kitchen as it will look like they are crowding each other.

However, in that same scenario and square footage, with a wall in between the two, you can have furniture against the wall on both sides if you have to, and in either room it will look fine.


So, what if space and furniture placement are worked out? Do you then automatically take down the wall?

Kitchen Open to Great Room

In new construction this is what we would do nine times out of ten because we have the opportunity to plan the two spaces to harmonize and coordinate with each other. We have an ultimate plan for everything to flow well together.

In a renovation, if you are not planning to re-do both rooms, you may be disappointed with taking the wall down and it may lead to yet another renovation in order to properly coordinate the two spaces.

If it is in your budget to cover all of these considerations, then your floor plan will tend look newer and more up to date if you take the wall down.

Kitchen Open to Living Room

The idea of transitional home plans with common area rooms open to one another is to firstly, reinforce the modern family as a group that functions together as a unit (as in, everyone is in the kitchen and working together--although, in my home they are indeed all in the kitchen but they would rather just keep me company and inquire as to what time we will be eating for dinner rather than actually doing anything--but its the encouragement that counts!) and secondly, to create spaces that are designed to serve more than one function.

If you have your kitchen coordinated with your living room or great room and they are open to one another, then you will have more room for things such as family or school projects, as well as having more room to entertain the entire soccer team after they win the big game, or as I often hear our clients say: "This is a great space for a Superbowl party!"....followed by a brand new dilemma: what size flat screen TV is best?

Hope this helps you decide--good luck with your project!"

Contact Stanton Homes for floor plan ideas, to get a new home cost estimate, or find out more about building a custom home in North Carolina.

Raleigh New Home Trends

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7 Ways to Create the Perfect Outdoor Living Space

Questions to ask before building a Multi Generational home

90 Photos of Custom Home Kitchen

Tags: kitchen, open floor plans, kitchen design, kitchen trends, custom home design trends

Kitchen Design Trends: What's Better, an Island or a Peninsula?

Posted by Penny Hull on Mon, Oct 10, 2011 @ 08:10 AM

Which kitchen style is better, a peninsula or island?

How to choose between adding a peninsula or island to your kitchen

 

We were recently asked this interior design question, through "Ask Andrea": 

"Hi Andrea, I'm thinking of remodeling my kitchen. What is the trend now peninsulas or islands? We currently have a peninsula and thinking of changing to an island."

And here's what Stanton Homes' on staff interior design expert Andrea has to say:

It is most important to consider the size of your kitchen rather than strictly following trends.

Kitchen Island Design

Island kitchens do seem to be the trend, but the reason they are the trend has to do with dimensions.

As houses have become larger over the past two decades, kitchens have become proportionally larger than they used to be.

In the progression of this change, it was discovered that as soon as you have one cabinet wall dimension of 12' or greater, that 45's into another cabinet wall, the functionality of the kitchen is improved if the third wall or " leg" of cabinets is an island rather than a peninsula.

This is because it allows you twice the access to the long wall that is 12' or greater, rather than just one access or traffic lane to access that whole wall and the other (probably shorter) wall.

Kitchen design is based on the work triangle of the number of steps between the sink, cook top, and refrigerator.  

Kitchen Island DesignKitchen Peninsula Design

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Kitchen Island Design                                                           Kitchen Peninsula Design

 

In larger kitchens, islands work better. In somewhat smaller kitchens, I prefer the peninsula.

Peninsula Kitchen Design

With a peninsula, you usually end up with more cabinets and greater square footage of counter top than when you cut up your space just to include a smaller island.

If you think about it, all you are doing in changing from a peninsula to an island is taking away a piece of the peninsula to create a walk way that you really don't need.

So, if your current kitchen is going to remain the same size after you remodel and your longest wall is shorter than 12', then I would stay with the peninsula layout if you want to ensure maximum counter space and storage for the square footage available.

Kitchen Tile Backsplash

Using updated counter-tops, back splashes, and lighting and even paying attention to smaller details like cabinet hardware and also wall color, should sufficiently create an updated and brand new look to your kitchen without compromising work space.

Good luck with everything and thank you again for your question--we love hearing from you and we love designing and building new kitchens for our homeowners every day!

 

Contact Stanton Homes for floor plan ideas, to get a new home cost estimate, or find out more about building a custom home in North Carolina.

Raleigh New Home Trends

New Home Exterior Styles from Craftsman to Contemporary

7 Ways to Create the Perfect Outdoor Living Space

Questions to ask before building a Multi Generational home

90 Photos of Custom Home Kitchen

 

Tags: Kitchen Islands, kitchen design trends, custom home design trends

Top 4 Questions to Ask when Designing Your Kitchen Layout

Posted by Penny Hull on Wed, Sep 14, 2011 @ 06:09 AM

What Determines the Shape of a Kitchen?

How to Design Your Raleigh New Home Kitchen

What kitchen design is best for you? Here are four questions you should be able to answer when building your new kitchen.

Open Floor Plan Kitchen

1. How much time will you spend in the kitchen?

Kitchens have become the most popular hang out area of the home, as shown by the increasing sizes of new home kitchens.

If you will be cooking, entertaining, helping with homework, and hanging out in the kitchen area, an open floor plan concept may be the way to go.

 

 

Eating Bar Kitchen

2. How many people will share the space?

Do you need separate cook and prep areas for multiple cooks, with additional usable counter space? If so, an island or peninsula kitchen might make sense.

Do you have kids that need a play or homework area nearby? If so, consider adding an eating bar, which can be used for work or play, within eyesight of the cook.

 

 

Island Kitchen

3. Where will your traffic flow?

Consider the number of entrances and the layout of the counter and/or island to know how effectively traffic can flow.

Do you want an open kitchen design, with free-flow traffic? Or do you want a kitchen with more direct paths between rooms?

For example, you may want a separate hallway from the kitchen to the formal dining room.

 

Accessible Kitchen Design

4. Is universal design or accessibility important to you?

Plan your kitchen around your needs!

For a universal design kitchen, consider including features like planned work centers, staging or landing areas, single lever faucets, pulls on cabinets, roll out shelves, open or visible storage (glass doors on cabinetry), and extra lighting throughout.

For an accessible kitchen, consider including features like reduced height countertops, built-in range countertops with front controls and knee space below, pull-out shelving, accessible electric outlets and switches, roll-under kitchen sinks.

Contact Stanton Homes for floor plan ideas, to get a new home cost estimate, or find out more about building a custom home in North Carolina.

Read about other custom home kitchen design trends and features:

90 Photos of Custom Home Kitchens

Kitchen Tile Backsplash Pictures - Popular Backsplash Designs

Kitchen Base Cabinet Storage Options - Top 5 Base Cabinet Options

Custom Home Kitchens - Examples of Kitchen Design Trends

Tags: kitchen floor plan modification, custom kitchen floor plans, kitchen design trends, custom home design trends