New Home Tips, Trends, and Ideas - Raleigh Custom Home Builders

How to Find an Accessible Floor Plan

Posted by Penny Hull on Fri, May 31, 2013 @ 15:05 PM

How to build an accessible home

Accessible home design

 

The best way to accomodate special needs is by building a custom home with everything just the way you want it. You won't find many accessible or ADA floor plans in online floor plan catalogs or search directories, so choose a builder with a design team that can create what you need, based on your priorities. A builder with experience in accessible home design can find offer many possibilities, with built-in features that make everything easier.

How to build an accessible homeHere is how a custom home builder modified a popular one story floor plan to create two distinctly different wheelchair accessible homes

The Elway, a plan by Frank Betz, was modified by Stanton Homes with these two resulting accessible home designs.

Pictured are the original plan and rendering, copyright Frank Betz:

How to build an accessible home

 

 This original version of the Elway is not an accessible floor plan.

An experienced builder can take plans like this and convert them into homes you can live in comfortably - without maneuverability or usability restrictions.

Take a look at how Stanton Homes can customize your floor plan to create an accessible home with everything just the way you want it, as reflected in the changes, below:

 

 

 

 

 

 

How to build an accessible home: floor plan design modification #1

The Elsworth - accessible custom home with second story bonus room

How to build an accessible home

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stanton Homes can modify your favorite floor plan into an accessible home, starting with these five central modifications: 

How to build an accessible home

1. Redesign kitchen and bathroom to add accessible features including roll-under sinks

2. Widen hallways

3. Enlarge bathrooms and laundry room to allow a full turn radius

4. Enlarge garage for ease of access

5. Add optional egress door off the master suite

 

 

 

How to build an accessible home: floor plan design modification #2

The Paige - accessible custom home with basement

How to build an accessible home

Also based on the Elway plan by Frank Betz, this version of the Paige includes two modifications in addtion to the changes made for the Elsworth:How to build an accessible home

1. The master suite was moved to the front of the home. An egress door was added for ease of access.

2. The homeowner's lot supported a basement below.

 

Why is it hard to find accessible floor plans?

One of the reasons it is so difficult to find plans for accessible homes is that needs vary so widely. Think about all the things you need and make sure your builder can include them. You don't have to settle for merely having wider hallways when you're building a custom home.

You can also specify which parts of your home you'd like to have accessible. Every bathroom, or just a certain section of the home? Lower kitchen cupboards? Easy to use door handles? A top builder will offer design services that look at every single detail of your new home.

Your custom home builder will work with you to meet your exact needs, and make suggestions according to your budget.

The first thing Stanton Homes builds into your accessible home is your lifestyle. Let’s talk about it. What would make everything easier? From zero threshold showers to wider hallways, first floor living, an elevator, universal design, and easy access driveway and beyond - we'll help you create an environment you'll love to live in.

Tags: How to build an accessible home, building an accessible home, North carolina accessible homes, accessible home design

NC Wheelchair Accessible Homes | Hallway and Doorway Requirements

Posted by Penny Hull on Wed, Mar 21, 2012 @ 08:03 AM

ADA and Wheelchair Accessibility

Accessible Hallways and Doorways

Wheelchair Accessible Homes | Hallway and Doorway Requirements

(Photo of an accessible custom home Raleigh NC - with wide archway entrances designed for wheelchairs.)

How to Make a Custom Home Accessible

We were recently asked this question:  "How can we modify our new home floor plan for wheelchair accessibility? How wide do hallways and doorways need to be for a wheelchair?"

It is important to consider wheelchair accessibility before building your new home - modifications to an existing home can be much more expensive. 

What are the Minimum Hallway and Doorway Width Requirements for a Wheelchair?

Both ADA requirements and Specially Adapted Housing Minimum Property Requirements specify:

 - Minimum hallway width of 48"

 - Minimum doorway width of 36"

 

Standard doorways in a new home are usually either 2'4", 2'6" or 2'8" wide, and according to North Carolina building code, the minimum width of a hallway is 36". 

How wide should the doorways and hallways be in your home?  Depends on what kind of access you're looking for.

Wheelchair Accessible Homes | Hallway and Doorway Requirements

 - Minimum clear width for a wheelchair is 36 inches for a hall and 32 inches for a door.

 - Minimum clear space for a T-shaped turn of 180 degrees is 36 inches in all directions.

 - The minimum passage width for one wheelchair and one ambulatory person is 48 inches.

 - Many mobility scooters are as narrow as 21". 

What are Some Additional Doorway Options?

If the home buyer simply wants wider doorways, but is not as concerned about having a 48" wide hallway, there may be some options that don't require significant structural changes.   And it's MUCH less expensive to plan for wider doorways before construction starts than to try to retrofit hallways and doorways later.

Wheelchair Accessible Homes | Hallway and Doorway Requirements

 - A 3'2" wide hallway will allow a 36" door, but there will be no room for trim.

 - A 3'8" width works well for a 36" door, and allows 2 1/4" trim, or casing, around the doorway. 

 - A 3'10" width is ideal for a 36" door, as it allows 3 1/4" casing around the doorway.

However, if someone is planning to build with a Specially Adapted Housing Grant, they are required to include 48" hallways to obtain the grant.  There also must be enough space to "allow for maneuverability through the hall and into all rooms, including bedrooms, bathrooms, and ingress/egress routes." 

How Can My Hallways Be Widened, and When is the Best Time to Plan for This?

In most cases, wider hallways means adding more square footage to the home.  At Stanton Homes, we are able to make almost all floor plan changes in-house, which can reduce the cost of making a new home wheelchair accessible. 

Or bring us any plans that you're considering, and we'll be happy to discuss what changes might be required to make your next home accessible. 

 

Experienced Accessible Home Builders –

Stanton Homes is an industry leading accessible, universal, certified Aging in Place and VA-approved Specially Adapted Housing custom home builder.

Whether you start with a plan that is designed for accessibility, ask us to modify or create a new plan, we can build in wider hallways and doorways, entry ways, turning radius, non-slip flooring, ramps and walkways, special lighting, roll out or pull out shelving, easy grope door, faucet and drawers, accessible switches, no step entries, roll-in showers, ADA roll-under countertops and work spaces, and whatever else you need.   

Wheelchair Accessible Homes | Hallway and Doorway Requirements

Tags: accessible home design, Wheelchair Accessible Home Builders, accessible home requirements, wheelchair accessible homes

Accessible Homes | Photos of Accessible Homes in Raleigh

Posted by Penny Hull on Thu, Jan 05, 2012 @ 08:01 AM

Top 3 Most Requested Accessible Homes

Wheelchair Accessible Homes in Raleigh

Wheelchair accessible homes in Raleigh include special features from open space to wider hallways and doorways, entry ways, turning radius, non-slip flooring, ramps and walkways, special lighting, roll out or pull out shelving, easy grope door, faucet and drawers, accessible switches, no step entries, roll-in showers, and ADA roll-under countertops and work spaces. 

Here are three most requested wheelchair accessible home plans for Raleigh custom homes:

1. The Dugan - Click here for photo gallery

This version of The Dugan first floor master suite home includes accessible and custom design features like:

 First Floor Master Suite Homes

- Entire 2nd Floor Mother in Law Suite

 - Fully Accessible Floor Plan with Elevator

 - Tucked in Front Porch, rear Screen Room

 - Customized Wide-Open Spaces, Oversized Garage, Attic Storage

 

2. The Greenhaven - Click here for photo gallery

Raleigh Accessible Homes

This version of The Greenhaven mother in law sutie home includes accessible and custom design features like:

- Full Mother-in-Law Suite with living room with living room

- Walk-up 3rd Floor Office

- Formal Dining with Wainscoating

- Full-Length Front Porch Front Porch

- Extra wide Signature Arches

- Side entry garage

 

3. The Devonsboro - Click here for photo gallery

Single Story Custom HomeThis version of The Devonsboro is a Frank Betz/Stanton Homes design: 

- Covered, arched entry and backyard deck

 - First Floor Office with French Doors

 - Master Bedroom with Stepped Trey Ceiling

 - 10’ Ceilings, Barrel Vaults, Archways

 - Great Room Coffered Ceiling

 

Experienced Accessible Home Builders –

Stanton Homes is an industry leading accessible, universal, certified Aging in Place and VA-approved Specially Adapted Housing custom home builder.

Whether you start with a plan that is designed for accessibility, ask us to modify or create a new plan, we can build in wider hallways and doorways, entry ways, turning radius, non-slip flooring, ramps and walkways, special lighting, roll out or pull out shelving, easy grope door, faucet and drawers, accessible switches, no step entries, roll-in showers, ADA roll-under countertops and work spaces, and whatever else you need.  

 

 

Tags: nc custom home builders, accessible homes, accessible home design, accessible home requirements, accessible builders

Top 5 Mother In Law Floor Plan Questions - Don't Forget to Ask!

Posted by Penny Hull on Tue, Jul 26, 2011 @ 14:07 PM

Top 5 Questions to Ask Before Buying

New Homes with Mother In-Law Suites   

New homes with mother in law suites are more popular than ever, as the economy shifts to a more condensed lifestyle. According to a  Coldwell Banker survey, financial reasons came up as the top answer homebuyers gave for wanting their new home to have a mother-in-law suite. 

Another big segment of homebuyers said that they wanted a home with an inlaw suite so that they would be able to take care of a family member in frail health. 

Before choosing a mother in law suite floor plan, you'll want to answer these five important questions:

1.  Is a Kitchenette Necessary?

If you have plenty of room in the budget, a kitchenette can be a great feature, and help keep the mother in law suite completely separate from the rest of the home.   But if you're trying to keep below a certain price point, this feature can be the easiest to pass on.

2.  Do you need a Second Entrance?

A second entrance can be a bonus for privacy, and for potential future conversion to a separate apartment.  But it might not be essential.  A typical French door can add $600 or so to the cost, plus the cost of any ramps, steps, or exterior lighting.

3.  How Big Should the Bathroom Be?

A mother in law suite can share a bath with the rest of the home (eliminating the need for a powder room) to save cost, or can have a completely separate bath.   This bathroom can have a tub, a shower only, or be a "second master bath" with both tub and shower. 

4.  Should the Mother in Law Suite be Accessible?

There are several factors to consider.  For resale, having at least an accessible guest suite can be a big plus - make sure the front entrance is easy to use, too.   Consider different levels of accessibility, too.   Do you need a bath with 5x5 turning radius, dismount space, and a roll in shower, or will just having a shower instead of a tub be enough? 

5.  Is Separate Living Space a Must?

A mother in law suite can consist of anything from a large bedroom with an attached bath to a full separate living area, with private sitting room, bedroom with oversized closet, and more.  Discuss your needs with your builder.   

Mother in Law Floor Plans | Mother In Law Suite Homes | Mother In Law Suite Floor Plans

Design/Build a Mother In Law Suite Floorplan

Stanton Homes specializes in unique design/build situations for homes in the $200s-$500s.   We'll work with you to create a mother in law suite floorplan that's perfect for your situation AND your budget. 

 

Browse Mother in Law Suite Floorplans Here

Click above for some great ideas, and sample mother in law suite floor plans.  Or just ask us, and Stanton Homes will send you additional mother in law suite floor plan ideas!

 Mother In Law Suite Floor Plans

 

 

Where to Build your Mother in Law Suite Home:

Stanton Homes builds custom homes on your lot throughout the greater Raleigh/Triangle area.

 

 

Here are just a few of the many areas available now:


Build On Your Lot in Apex NC

Build On Your Lot in Cary NC

Build On Your Lot in Fuquay-Varina NC

Build On Your Lot in Garner NC

Build On Your Lot in Holly Springs NC  Build on Your Lot Raleigh | Build On Your Lot Builder | How to Build on Your Lot

Build On Your Lot in Raleigh NC

Build On Your Lot in Wake Forest NC 


 

 

Tags: accessible home design, mother in law suite, mother in law suite floorplans

Wheelchair Accessible Bathrooms

Posted by Penny Hull on Mon, Jul 25, 2011 @ 14:07 PM

Home Builders for Wheelchair Accessible Bathrooms

 Accessible Home Ideas for your new Raleigh Accessible Home

Wheelchair Accessible Bathrooms | Accessible Home Builders Raleigh

Stanton Homes is an industry leading accessible, universal, certified Aging in Place and VA-approved Specially Adapted Housing custom home builder.

Whether you start with a plan that is designed for accessibility, ask us to modify or create a new plan, we can build in wider hallways and doorways, entry ways, turning radius, non-slip flooring, ramps and walkways, special lighting, roll out or pull out shelving, easy grope door, faucet and drawers, accessible switches, no step entries, roll-in showers, ADA roll-under countertops and work spaces, and whatever else you need. 

Here's examples of these accessible home requirements: 

Wheelchair Accessible Bathrooms with Wider Hallways and Doors, with Turning Radius:

Accessible baths should have room for maneuvering with a 5 Foot Minimum Diameter:

Wheelchair Accessible Bathrooms | Accessible Home Builders Raleigh

Wheelchair Accessible Bathrooms with Safety Features:

Non-slip flooring and special lighting. Natural light is an important consideration for aging in place and accessible baths: 

Wheelchair Accessible Bathrooms | Accessible Home Builders Raleigh

Wheelchair Accessible Bathrooms with Easy to Use 

Roll out or pull out shelving, easy grope door, faucet and drawers, and accessible switches are seemingly small details that can make a big difference in wheelchair accessibility of a bath:  

Wheelchair Accessible Bathrooms | Accessible Home Builders Raleigh

Wheelchair Accessible Bathrooms with no Step Entries, Roll-in Showers

This roll-in shower has a small ramp leading in: 

Wheelchair Accessible Bathrooms | Accessible Home Builders Raleigh

Wheelchair Accessible Bathrooms with ADA Roll-Under Counter Tops and Work Spaces

Knee Space Under Countertops and Reduced Height Countertops are key accessible bath features. This powder room has an accessible vanity with space for a wheelchair to roll underneath: 

Wheelchair Accessible Bathrooms | Accessible Home Builders Raleigh

 

 

Tags: universal design homes, Universal Design Home Builders, accessible homes, accessible home design, accessible home requirements, accessible shower, accessible baths

How to Design Your Closet - Master Suite Closet Photos

Posted by Penny Hull on Mon, Jun 27, 2011 @ 13:06 PM

Custom Home Master Suite Closet Designs

Storage Centers, Built-in Shelving

Need ideas on how to customize your Master Suite Closet? The options are endless, so here are some examples of recent homes to get you started.

Special features included in these Master Bedroom Closets include: wrap around shelving, wrap around rods, built-ins, shoe racks, island cabinetry (built for wheelchair accessibility), hardwood flooring, and natural light.

Check out the Master Closet designs in these Raleigh New Homes:

 

Master Suite Closet Storage Design

A splash of color, open floor space, and bright natural light make this closet feel more like a room than a closet.

An entire wall of built-in shelves on the right complements the rows of hanging rods on the left.

A storage or sitting bench could be placed under the window.  

 

Custom Home Closets | Master Bedroom Closet | Storage Space Ideas

 

This Master Closet features full wrap-around storage space and built-in options

Wood flooring gives this space a more elegant look and feel.

Plenty of overhead lighting keep the room bright and easy to navigate.

 

 

 Master Bedroom Closet Storage Ideas

Line your built-ins with cute baskets, storage containers, or pieces of art.

With so many built-in shelves in this Master Closet, you can afford to get creative with your space!

 

  

Accessible Home Master Closet

Located within a Fully Accessible Home, this Walk in Closet includes wrap around wood Shelving and Center Island Cabinetry.

The Center Island is designed to be navigated by a wheelchair, and serves as storage space, a folding table, and a staging area for laundry.

This Accessible Master Closet also features natural light, built-ins, hanging rods, and hardwood flooring.

If you're considering a new home in the Raleigh area, ask your custom home builder to help you design your new Master Closet with ideas like these!

 

Interested in other New Home Trends and Custom Home Design Ideas?

Small Changes Make Big Differences - Floor Plan Modifications

Butler's Pantry Ideas and Pictures

Are Stainless Steel Appliances Going Out of Style?

Barrel Vault Foyer Ideas and Photos

What are Homeowners Giving Up to Stay On Budget?

Why Buy New instead of Used?

Top 5 Trey Ceiling Treatments

Tags: master closet design, close, closet pictures, closet storage ideas, accessible home design, wheelchair accessible homes

Universal Design: What Features to Consider in Your New Home

Posted by Penny Hull on Mon, Apr 11, 2011 @ 11:04 AM

Universal Design Options to Consider

Top 4 Areas You'll Want to Tackle with Universal Design Concepts

The most popular features in a universal home focus on ease-of-use. When you talk with your builder about special adaptations to make your home work with you for years to come, consider the difference it would make to have these kinds of universal design adjustments:

 

Universal Design Elevator

Ease of movement throughout the home

  • No steps (possible ramps or elevators)
  • Smooth surface flooring, non-slip tile or dense-weave carpet
  • Wide hallways and doorways
  • Open floor plan

 

Universal Design Kitchen

 

A kitchen anybody can cook in:

    • Lowered countertops and cabinets
    • Appliance accessibility
    • Open knee space under sinks and counters
    • Full extension drawers
    • Shallow sink with side-mounted faucet

 


Universal Design Shower

Special touches in the Master suite:

  • First floor location
  • Adjustable hanging rods and shelves in closets
  • Bathroom with integrated grab bars
  • Curbless shower with transfer bench
  • Slide-bar showerhead and/or multiple-height showerhead

Other universal options throughout the home:

  • Lever handles on all doors and faucets
  • Sliding casement windows
  • Light switches 36 inches or lower from the floor
  • Electrical outlets 25 inches or more above the floor

Universal Design Closet

 

These kinds of features help your home adjust to changing needs over the years as your family grows, you care for elderly relatives, and you even grow older, yourself.

The more you consider as your new home is built, the less you will need to remodel later – and the more you will enjoy your home for years to come.

 

Experienced Accessible Home Builders –

Stanton Homes is an industry leading accessible, universal, certified Aging in Place and VA-approved Specially Adapted Housing custom home builder.

Whether you start with a plan that is designed for accessibility, ask us to modify or create a new plan, we can build in wider hallways and doorways, entry ways, turning radius, non-slip flooring, ramps and walkways, special lighting, roll out or pull out shelving, easy grope door, faucet and drawers, accessible switches, no step entries, roll-in showers, ADA roll-under countertops and work spaces, and whatever else you need. 

 

Tags: universal design, universal design homes, Universal Design Home Builders, accessible home design, universal design ideas

How to Build an Accessible Home | Accessible Driveway Requirements

Posted by Penny Hull on Fri, Mar 18, 2011 @ 08:03 AM

Raleigh Accessible Home Design | Driveway Design for Universal Homes

When building an accessible or universal design home, there are specific requirements and guidelines for how custom builders design the driveway, walkway, and entrances. Here are the basics you'll want to discuss with your custom home builder.

Universal design homes should offer driveways that are a little wider than normal, usually at least 12 feet wide, with an easy turn onto the property.  The end of the driveway should be flared to accommodate turning. 

This accessible home garage has a walkway that wraps the home, and ample turning space in the driveway:

How to Build an Accessible Home | Wheelchair Accessible Driveway Requirements

 

A universal design driveway needs to be formed from a smooth surface material such as concrete or asphalt, particularly in areas where passengers will be loading and unloading. 

Slope should be minimized where possible, with careful grading.  In regions where icy conditions are possible, it is recommended that the grade of the driveway not exceed 10 percent. In warmer regions, the recommended slope is 15 percent.

 

This Raleigh custom home has a wheelchair accessible driveway and zero threshold front door:

How to Build an Accessible Home | Wheelchair Accessible Driveway Requirements

If the driveway will be used regularly as a walkway to the home, the area should be graded to about 8 percent, with a maximum 1:12 slope to accommodate wheelchairs.  This is a slope typical for wheelchair ramps as well.

Your driveway should provide level access to your home if at all possible. The driveway should do the climbing – not you. If it is designed appropriately within the constraints of the site, you may be able to avoid steps and ramps.

If your home is on a hill, the place where you park should be at the same level as the foundation. If your home is on a slope, you’ll need a level plateau where you can climb out of your car with adjacent access to a walkway – and you’ll need 60 inches diameter in order to maneuver a wheelchair. 

Keep this in mind when choosing the lot for your new custom universal design home. A more level lot can help you save significantly on costs for grading, building retaining walls, and either removing or importing soil to create sufficient level ground.

All of these accommodations need to be considered before construction begins on your home. It may even be necessary to change the home’s design to offer an ideally designed driveway. 

For example, most homes have their garage or carport on the low side of a slope, which means there will be steps leading into the home.  This type of construction helps limit site costs, but if steps need to be eliminated, your builder may be able to move the driveway and entrances to the high side of a slope. This could keep steps from being required.  However, this may require additional costs for foundation and driveway, as the entire home may need to built a little higher.

You may also want to provide a carport or covered walkway to provide protection against the weather. This can be constructed at the same time as your home, or added later.

If a site is well planned, it may also be able to accommodate later changes to the driveway, such as widening or lengthening so that additional vehicles can park there.

Custom touches can also make life easier, such as reflective markers at the entrance and both sides of a steep or curved driveway, snowmelt tubing installed in the driveway surface in cold climates, or freaming of the area that leads into the home.

Check with your custom home builder for more ways to make your driveway a universal design.

How to Build an Accessible Home | Wheelchair Accessible Driveway Requirements

Experienced Accessible Home Builders –

Stanton Homes is an industry leading accessible, universal, certified Aging in Place and VA-approved Specially Adapted Housing custom home builder.

Whether you start with a plan that is designed for accessibility, ask us to modify or create a new plan, we can build in wider hallways and doorways, entry ways, turning radius, non-slip flooring, ramps and walkways, special lighting, roll out or pull out shelving, easy grope door, faucet and drawers, accessible switches, no step entries, roll-in showers, ADA roll-under countertops and work spaces, and whatever else you need.  

Get help finding an accessible home floor plan in North Carolina, here.

Tags: How to build an accessible home, nc custom home builders, universal design homes, Universal Design Home Builders, accessible homes, accessible home design

Universal Design Home Tips: Fully Accessible Garage Designs

Posted by Penny Hull on Wed, Mar 09, 2011 @ 06:03 AM

Universal Design Garages - How to build an accessible garage in Raleigh NC

Universal garages are designed to accommodate special needs. These tips will help you understand what makes accessible home garages unique, with specific width and height requirements for North Carolina homes. Here are the basics:

 

Universal Design Garages | How To Build an Accessible Garage | NC Custom Home BuildersUniversal garages are usually either attached to the home with a direct (no step) entrance or connected to it with a sheltered breezeway at least 36 inches wide.

Building codes may require a step or curb between the house and garage floor to prevent fumes from entering the house.

  • If code requires floor to be several inches below entrance to house for fume protection, the entire floor can be sloped from front to back to eliminate need for ramp or step
  • Ramp to doorway can be provided if needed

If these codes do not apply, thresholds should not be higher than ¼ inch.

Single-bay garage doors need to be 8 feet high for a large SUV or pickup truck, higher for special vehicles such as a van with a chairlift—an extra 18" to 24" compared to most standard doors.

There should be an at least 5 feet wide aisle adjacent to the vehicle for easy access to the vehicle while inside the garage.

Lift-equipped vehicles may require an 8 foot aisle. (A two car garage accommodates this if only one vehicle is parked)

Steps require a railing on both sides 34 to 38 inches high that can support at least 250 pounds. A second, lower handrail 28 inches is helpful. Allow enough clear space near the steps to build a ramp later, in case it becomes necessary.

Consider including well-placed electrical outlets that eliminate or reduce extension cord usage. Outlets should be 18 inches above the floor to reduce the need for reaching and bending, and at workbench heighUniversal Design Garages | How To Build an Accessible Garage | NC Custom Home Builderst in that area.

Make getting into your home from the garage easier.  The door from garage into home should be extra wide.  We recommend choosing to include lever-style handles and secure, easy-to-maneuver locks.

Universal devices for the garage

Life is easier with the addition of a few small extras that light up your universal design garage without a lot of manual labor. Ask your builder which amenities would best suit your individual needs.

  • Automatic garage door opener
  • Electric sensor to prevent door from closing inappropriately
  • Easy-to-reach push-button keypad allows access without keys or opener
  • Button controlled automatic door openers can be installed on all doors (people as well as vehicle passageways)
  • Motion-detector lights
  • Lighted switches.
  • Motion-sensor downlight above garage door
  • Path lights to define edges of driveway

Universal Design Garage Cost

Building costs are dependent on current pricing of materials and labor. But there are some basic costs inherent to every universal design garage. Here’s how it breaks down, so you can ask your builder what the current pricing is for the kinds of materials you want used in the construction of your new garage. 

One of the biggest cost factors is, of course, the size of the garage.

Basic structure: Footings, foundation, framing, roofing, siding, doors, windows.

Electrical components: Duplex outlets, light fixtures, single pole switches, sensors, keypads, extrUniversal Design Garages | How To Build an Accessible Garage | NC Custom Home Buildersa lighting.

Siding materials such as: Brick veneer, stone veneer, Hardiboard siding, vinyl clapboard siding, vertical vinyl siding.

Roofing materials such as: asphalt shingles, standing seam metal, cedar shakes.

 

Experienced Accessible Home Builders –

Stanton Homes is an industry leading accessible, universal, certified Aging in Place and VA-approved Specially Adapted Housing custom home builder.

Whether you start with a plan that is designed for accessibility, ask us to modify or create a new plan, we can build in wider hallways and doorways, entry ways, turning radius, non-slip flooring, ramps and walkways, special lighting, roll out or pull out shelving, easy grope door, faucet and drawers, accessible switches, no step entries, roll-in showers, ADA roll-under countertops and work spaces, and whatever else you need.  

Get help finding an accessible home floor plan in North Carolina, here.

 

Tags: Universal Design Garages, How To Build an Accessible Garage, nc custom home builders, universal design homes, Universal Design Home Builders, accessible homes, accessible home design

Choosing the Right Lot for your Universal Design or Accessible Home

Posted by Penny Hull on Mon, Feb 07, 2011 @ 06:02 AM

How to Choose the Right Lot for your New Home

Universal Design and Accessible Homes:  What to Look For

How to Choose a Lot for Universal Design Homes | Custom Accessible Home BuildersLooking for a lot for your new Universal Design home requires even more foresight than a traditional custom home. Here’s what to keep in mind to help ensure the special features that make your home easy to use don’t end up costing a lot more than you’re ready for.

No reputable builder can tell you the final cost for your new home until he knows where it’s being built, and what work on the lot will entail.

If you have a new home plan in mind, the lot needs to be able to fit it. If you have some flexibility in your final design decisions, you have more options – but it’s still important to know the overall cost of construction can be dramatically different when a lot isn’t compatible to a Universal Design home.

Here’s what you need to know:

Lot size:

Smaller lots usually require multi-story homes – which necessitate the use of a stairway or elevator.

Lot slope:

A flat or gentle slope is the best terrain for a universal design home.

Steep slopes are usually more suited to a split-level home or daylight basement home. Since an accessible home requires that a bedroom, bathroom and kitchen all be located on a single level, this could require a much broader footprint for one of the levels. Due to the nature of a split level home, each level would also require a separate stairway or elevator – the floor cannot be navigated with a single system. If you opt to move dirt in order to avoid a split-level home, find out how much that will cost before committing to the lot.

Site conditions:

Soil: Sandy soil is the best natural soil for construction. Heavier silts and softer clay may require additional work, especially if a septic system is required. The cost of additional fill may be even higher to complete accessibility requirements.

Water: Foundation footings and slabs need to sit above the water table (depth where water sits year-round.) If the site has a high water table, your builder will need to fill to raise the grade. This also could necessitate extra cost, in maintaining accessibility to at least one entrance.

Building Envelope: Set-back, side-yard requirements and no-building areas may mean the lot is not as big as it appears, in terms of usable space. This could mean that the one-story home you have in mind cannot be built on the lot you have in mind.

When your Universal Design builder inspects your lot, he will be able to show you what it will take to orient a home on the site.  Ask an experienced accessible home builder to inspect the lot before you buy.

How to Choose a Lot for Universal Design Homes | Custom Accessible Home BuildersIf you love the lot, be prepared for possible changes to your floor plan, including basics such as moving the parking area from the low side to the high side of the home.

In addition to the special needs inside the home, the lot also needs to accommodate a smooth transition into the home through level or step-less entrances.

Just as the property may need to have dirt moved in order to provide its Universal Design interior, exterior access may require bridges, ramps, berms, or sloped walkways.

If the home is built so that the ground slopes upward to it, grading can ease the incline with gently rising pathways. Your builder may also recommend that a berm be created alongside the home, in order to accommodate a paved ramp. 

Don’t forget to make sure you’re thinking beyond your Universal Design home, itself, when considering the usability of your lot!

It's not as hard as it sounds, with the help of an experienced accessible home builder.

*Universal Design (UD) (encompassing “aging in place,” “accessible living,” and “barrier-free living”) is an approach to building that makes everyday actions easier.

Universal Design meets the needs of the present and the future.

Consider universal design concepts for your next home - universal design is most cost efficient and effective when incorporated directly into your new home.

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